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Gallery 263 http://gallery263.com a multi-functional art space Fri, 15 Feb 2019 23:54:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.0.3 A Complicated Relationship: Ansel Adams and Landscape Aestheticization http://gallery263.com/anseladams/ http://gallery263.com/anseladams/#respond Tue, 15 Jan 2019 01:23:17 +0000 http://gallery263.com/?p=17357 The post A Complicated Relationship: Ansel Adams and Landscape Aestheticization appeared first on Gallery 263.

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COMING TOGETHER AT AN INTIMATE CAMBRIDGE MUSIC VENUE


By Nick Ingrisani of In This River


The last time In This River performed at Gallery 263’s intimate Cambridge music venue was in 2015, early in the life of the band. Right from the start of that set, we felt the space represented what we set out to achieve with our music. The expressions of other artists coloring the walls, the small, intimate space itself, the stripped-down, acoustic, raw nature of the performance — it was the feeling that we had made it home.

The intimacy of a space like Gallery 263 welcomes and nurtures a profound harmony between the performers and the people who come to listen. We had never played a show quite like this before. There is no clanging of glasses, no humming chatter in the crowd, no bartenders taking orders. The space guides the attention of the performers and the audience together and binds everyone there in a unique experience of art, sound, and energy.

When you start a band, it’s like planting a seed. The band is the seed and the members are the nutrients it needs to grow. One of us is the water, the other is the sunlight. Then there’s the earth where that seed is planted – that’s the supportive network of friends and family integral to its growth, the people that the music reaches, and the spaces that come to shape the songs and the message.

There is a language beyond the spoken word that exists in harmony—a language that must be felt to be understood.

Watching that seed grow and being a part of its development, symbiosis, and abundance has taught me much about the nature of relationships. As with everything in life, this has been a journey; every step along the journey influencing the character and growth of the whole. It’s difficult to describe the evolution of our music over the period that we lived together in Boston, but through our time together and the constant playing, we could feel our separate identities and experiences unifying into one harmonious sound. When vocal harmonies fall perfectly into place you can feel the emergence of something much greater than the notes themselves. There is a language beyond the spoken word that exists in harmony—a language that must be felt to be understood.

Two years ago, Zach and I left our lives in Boston to embark on our own individual journeys across the world. In these intervening years, we have continued to cross paths, share, and collaborate within the heart of that seed that started it all in the first place. In This River dug its roots into the fertile ground of Boston and has continued to grow in its own way ever since. The band, its collective song, and our friendship remains alive and vibrant in our hearts.

To be able to return to Gallery 263 now for such a special show is a righteous opportunity. We’re grateful that our lives can sync up for the moment and for anyone who wishes to share it with us.

All together, in harmony.

In This River return to Gallery 263 for a special performance on Friday, September 28. Part storytelling and part musical journey. Zach and Nick will each share songs and stories of their individual journeys over the past two years, followed by a performance together, revisiting old and new songs alike. Doors at 7:30pm, music at 8:00pm.

ABOUT

Putnam & Pearl is Gallery 263’s new journal covering events, exhibition reviews, and artist profiles both here at the gallery and wherever cool stuff is happening in the Greater Boston Area.

Like to pitch an entry?
Contact: catherine@gallery263.com







Sign Up for the Gallery 263 Newsletter

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Meet the Residents Series: Woomin Kim http://gallery263.com/meet-the-residents-series-woomin-kim/ http://gallery263.com/meet-the-residents-series-woomin-kim/#respond Tue, 31 Jul 2018 17:04:00 +0000 http://gallery263.com/?p=14859 The post Meet the Residents Series: Woomin Kim appeared first on Gallery 263.

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MEET THE RESIDENTS SERIES: WOOMIN KIM


By Catherine Graffam on July 30, 2018



Do you know what cement is made of? Or how about all of the bits and pieces inside of your smartphone?

Woomin Kim, a Cambridge-based sculptor and one of Gallery 263’s summer residents was struck by the lack of answers she had to these type of questions upon visiting the Harvard Museum of Natural History’s rock & mineral collection.

Woomin Kim with her photographic reference from the Harvard Museum

Through her many visits since she found that so many of the featured specimens are the building blocks to urban life, and that the connection between the raw material in the glass cases and their uses in our everyday life had been lost. Most of us probably don’t know what cement really is (mostly limestone and other minerals), but entrust that it will hold the buildings and bridges that we use. A potentially panic-inducing thought.

Kim has since combined research and sculptor’s ingenuity in her current project and reverse engineers the lost connection by using domestic objects to recreate the appearance of rocks and minerals found at Harvard’s museum. She’s found inventive ways of achieving this; like using reflective star-shaped stickers to mimic the sheen of fragmented opal. The recognizable but imaginative substances that build the illusion in Kim’s pieces help the viewer build a relationship with the rocks by connecting with materials they already know.

One thread between the couple dozen works Kim has created in the past few weeks during the residency is that they all include embroidery, something which was completely alien to Kim before beginning this project. She says the soft, delicate nature of embroidery aids in accentuating the contrast between her pieces and the real thing.

Manipulating material is part of the fabric of Kim’s being. She recounts as a child she carved and dug holes through her desks, lit things on fire and felt that she learned most from handling objects. Natural curiosity and a hands-on approach is the driving force for her work that explores the elements that holds our twenty-first-century lives together.

It might be time to head over to the Harvard Museum, and then of course to Gallery 263 to see Woomin Kim’s creations.

You can find more of her work at http://woominkim.com

ABOUT

Putnam & Pearl is Gallery 263’s new journal covering events, exhibition reviews, and artist profiles both here at the gallery and wherever cool stuff is happening in the Greater Boston Area.

Like to pitch an entry?
Contact: catherine@gallery263.com







Sign Up for the Gallery 263 Newsletter

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Keep our community art spaces thriving http://gallery263.com/there-used-to-be-more-spaces-like-this-in-cambridge-now-youre-the-only-one-left-2-2/ Fri, 27 Jul 2018 17:36:56 +0000 http://gallery263.com/?p=17014 Community arts spaces like Gallery 263 are vital to Cambridge and other communities as they offer a place where residents, artists, and visitors to come together to share, respond to, and celebrate artistic ideas. Will you make a gift today to ensure that the Gallery can continue to support emerging artists and curators? Gallery 263 […]

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Community arts spaces like Gallery 263 are vital to Cambridge and other communities as they offer a place where residents, artists, and visitors to come together to share, respond to, and celebrate artistic ideas.

Will you make a gift today to ensure that the Gallery can continue to support emerging artists and curators?

Gallery 263 is unique in the variety and scale of programming it offers. Through artist-led workshops, multisensory events, exhibitions, and mini festivals, artists and audiences have the opportunity to truly be a part of a community and celebrate what makes that experience special and unique. With its Exhibition Proposal Series, Gallery 263 becomes a laboratory where artists can cultivate ideas and audiences and explore new approaches to creating and exhibiting artwork with the broader community.

Community art spaces thrive on inclusion and provide a democratic approach that allows for broad public access not as readily available in organizations that have institutional barriers related to access and cost. With world class museums and exhibition programs scattered across the city, there are frequent and exciting opportunities for audiences in Cambridge to experience high-quality artwork from the old masters to present day artists working at the peak of their careers. From its perch in the heart of Cambridgeport, Gallery 263 flips the audience experience, providing a more immersive experience of artwork and, especially, artmaking by local artists!

Supporting the Gallery today will allow it to keep shining brightly for many years to come. 

Warmly,

Jason Weeks
Executive Director
Cambridge Arts Council

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Meet the Residents Series: Graham Yeager http://gallery263.com/meet-the-residents-series-graham-yeager-draft/ http://gallery263.com/meet-the-residents-series-graham-yeager-draft/#respond Fri, 20 Jul 2018 17:53:29 +0000 http://gallery263.com/?p=14817 The post Meet the Residents Series: Graham Yeager appeared first on Gallery 263.

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MEET THE RESIDENTS SERIES: GRAHAM YEAGER


By Catherine Graffam on July 19, 2018



For six weeks each summer our gallery space is transformed into a working studio during our Artist Residency Program. They hustle to create new work and put on a short exhibition as summer draws to a close.

During the first open critique event to discuss the residents’ work-in-progress, a solid twenty minutes was spent energetically creating holes in a Gallery 263-shaped piece of paper using a range of different sized punchers (they make those). The participants were asked to document any object or sensory experience in the space using these tools. What resulted was a variety of responses to the open-ended prompt and limited tool range; from representing the placement of people in the room, to the lights on the ceiling, or something as abstract as the noise of the air conditioner. It was a grounding activity that drove the participants to react to the here-and-now, and with each other in the physical space.

Graham Yeager during our first open critique

You also find that you learn about the choices you make in these moments, even if it as removed as simply putting some holes in paper. Is it art, a performance, or a game? Regardless, it’s fun.

This is the goal for Graham Yeager’s project; to create a proactive and engaging experience between him and the audience, and between the audience members themselves. The act of collaboratively creating something in the moment is a vehicle for the interaction it facilitates. That interaction, he says, is the “salsa” of the piece. 

While in the past the work has been focused on a one-on-one between the artist and participant, Yeager’s plan is to open up the format to be more group focused with his current project.

A source of inspiration for this interactive work was Yeager’s own struggle to be present in his life, a difficult achievement living in age full of distractions at your fingertips. With a professional background in product design as well as ceramics, building something which sparked discovery and rewarded curiosity has always driven him to create.

Another surprising influence is his recently found passion for Dungeons & Dragons. While seemingly unconnected, Yeager sees it as a performance not all too different than what he is creating now. Both have a set of rules, a problem to solve, and an end result in creating something new with others.

Yeager asks “Do you want to be a better human with me?”

You’ll be able to be part of the My Neighborhood Constellation Project event on Saturday, August 4 from 3-5PM

And don’t forget to come to the residency showcase reception on August 10, 7-9PM

His work can be found at http://www.grahamyeager.com/

ABOUT

Putnam & Pearl is Gallery 263’s new journal covering events, exhibition reviews, and artist profiles both here at the gallery and wherever cool stuff is happening in the Greater Boston Area.

Like to pitch an entry?
Contact: catherine@gallery263.com







Sign Up for the Gallery 263 Newsletter

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A conversation with the newest members of Gallery 263’s staff http://gallery263.com/there-used-to-be-more-spaces-like-this-in-cambridge-now-youre-the-only-one-left-2/ Fri, 18 May 2018 17:34:19 +0000 http://gallery263.com/?p=17009 Recently, Gallery 263 hired three new staff members to serve a variety of roles. We sat down with Catherine Graffam, our new exhibitions manager, Pamela Ross, our communications manager, and Becca Smith, our music manager, to discuss what attracted them to the gallery, what makes them tick, and their dreams for the space in the years to come. […]

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Recently, Gallery 263 hired three new staff members to serve a variety of roles. We sat down with Catherine Graffam, our new exhibitions manager, Pamela Ross, our communications manager, and Becca Smith, our music manager, to discuss what attracted them to the gallery, what makes them tick, and their dreams for the space in the years to come.

To celebrate our tenth year, Gallery 263 is embarking on an ambitious campaign through July 2018. Your gift today will ensure that the Gallery will provide enriching programming and captivating art for years to come!

Q: How did you stumble upon Gallery 263?
Catherine Graffam: I originally discovered the gallery from a juried exhibition I participated in, back in 2016. I knew I wanted to be involved with the organization because I could feel how special it was to the people here.
Pamela Ross: I also discovered the gallery through my artistic endeavors: I first performed stand up at Gallery 263 in 2016, as part of the day-long Port Sounds Music & Comedy Festival. I was really impressed with the show itself, the beautiful space, and the strength of programming. I instinctively knew that I wanted to be involved someday.
Becca Smith: I was originally drawn to the gallery through the Foraged Banquet; I was struck by the wonderful community surrounding the gallery and the fun happenings here, and have been a big fan since! I’ve been a Cambridge resident for 12+ years and I feel lucky to be part of this unique organization and to contribute to the work here.

Q: What’s the best thing about working here?
CG: It’s gotta be working with emerging artists during our Exhibition Proposal Series shows to help achieve the visions for their exhibitions.
PR: I love watching people interact with and learn about the art in real time, especially the ones who’ve never been here before. You never know what perspective they’re bringing to their interpretation of the work and what meanings a piece might hold for them.
BS: I get to be blown away by talented musicians every week! They have helped me to realize how unusual a setup we have—they play for really attentive audiences in this lovely, ever-changing setting. And I love that by hosting shows, I get to spend extra time with the art in the space!

Q: What specific life experience brought you to love cultural organizations?
PR: Growing up, my parents were able to expose me to live music, dance, and theater early on; it was something they really cared about themselves. I was so fortunate to have those experiences, and they resonated with me deeply, even as a young kid. Maybe it goes back to seeing “Cats” on Broadway and loving the spectacle of it all.
CG: Having worked in fine art galleries since I was 18, there is a sense of pride and satisfaction that comes with bringing people together over art, and highlighting the amazing work artists do.
BS: I can also thank my parents for exposing me to the arts as I grew up—though I admit I appreciate this more in hindsight than I did at the time! During college, the breaks I took to see live music in Central Square (RIP TT’s) definitely helped keep me sane and happy.

Q: Why are community art spaces important to you?
BS: Being in and around art brings me lots of joy and inspiration and wonder and peace. Community art spaces make these experiences more widely accessible, and can help to challenge assumptions about where art lives and who makes it.
CG: As a marginalized person and as an artist, it is essential for me to surround myself with a community dedicated to uplifting the arts of everyone and for everyone.

Q: Do you have any memorable Gallery 263 stories for us?
BS: I hosted a concert during I need to see other people suffer to exist at all. A torch. A torch in their hearts., and when I spoke to one of the musicians after, he mentioned that when he first read the title of the show that night, he sort of hated it. But during his set, as he spent time with the art and performed with it around him, he “got it,” and ended up feeling very connected to it. I like that we sometimes challenge people with what we share, but we support them as they explore it.
PR: I was gallery sitting one day during that same show, which included several taxidermied animals, and some schoolchildren came in. They were transfixed by the animals, and in a few minutes went from being scared of them to giving each one a distinctive name.

Q: What makes Gallery 263 unique?
CG: What I find truly unique about Gallery 263 is how the commercial aspect of fine art takes a backseat, which expands the possibilities in hosting amazing exhibitions.
PR: Yes, absolutely the prioritization of pushing artistic boundaries and supporting artists’ development over the commercial aspect. The gallery’s respect for artists is paramount.
BS: And it’s all happening in this really fun, unpretentious space. Being a gallery, it can understandably seem a bit intimidating at first, but generally once people get in the door, they get a different feeling; it helps that we host such an eclectic variety of art and events!

Q: Why is it important that Gallery 263 is in our community?
CG: It’s the only art gallery in Cambridgeport, and one of only a few non-profit art galleries in the Boston area. Our programming is in cooperation with the neighborhood community, and we offer a warm environment for creative enrichment beyond just fine art.

Q: What would you say to a Gallery 263 donor if they were here right now?
BS: First, I’d say “thank you!” Then I’d tell them their donation really makes a difference, and we will put it to great use: Gallery 263 provides a remarkable amount of programming on an incredibly lean budget.
CG: I’d tell them their support is incredibly appreciated and goes directly to funding the programs that make Gallery 263 special and a valuable asset to our communities.

Q: What would you say to someone considering making a donation to Gallery 263?
PR: No matter the size, your gift is appreciated and goes directly towards supporting our mission: advancing the endeavors of artists and performers while fostering public engagement, enrichment, and exchange.

Gallery 263 is celebrating its 10th year with an ambitious campaign! A big thanks to all our supporters over the years and those who have made a gift already.

Please support the gallery today.

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“There used to be more spaces like this in Cambridge—now, you’re the only one left.” http://gallery263.com/there-used-to-be-more-spaces-like-this-in-cambridge-now-youre-the-only-one-left/ Mon, 14 May 2018 17:29:14 +0000 http://gallery263.com/?p=16999 A longtime Cambridge resident told me this just the other day. And it rang true more than ever. Due to quickly increasing rent and constant demands for space, galleries and non-profits in Cambridge and beyond are increasingly being forced to make the toughest decision of their history: can we afford to support the next generation […]

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A longtime Cambridge resident told me this just the other day. And it rang true more than ever.

Due to quickly increasing rent and constant demands for space, galleries and non-profits in Cambridge and beyond are increasingly being forced to make the toughest decision of their history: can we afford to support the next generation of artists?

Given these realities, I can’t help but be proud that Gallery 263 has endured and thrived for 10 years–and with your help, our mission can continue.

Your gift today will ensure that Gallery 263 will provide enriching programming and captivating art for years to come!

As both an artist and a lifetime Cambridgeportian (that’s a word, right?), I am so proud that we’ve continued to sustain such a vibrant, creative organization as the neighborhood continues to grow and change. It’s a unique space in more ways than one, from our location in a bustling residential area, to our quirky mix of programming that welcomes artists, families, yogis, and stand-up comics alike. I hope you’ll join us as we look forward to our next 10 years on Pearl Street. With your support, we can reach more artists, greet more new faces, and continue our mission to enrich the cultural landscape of our community.

Make your gift today!

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